• Introduction
  • Body
  • Point 1—Rising Action (this) Anxiety and negative emotions are so often suppressed.  From youth to adulthood, we are taught to suppress expression.
  • Point 2—Climax (means that) It is reserved for those with extreme situations.
  • Point 3—Denouncement (so then, I propose this)  I propose the development of a toolkit for adults to be able to use artistic expression as an everyday means of promoting positive mental health.
  • Conclusion

  • INTRODUCTION
  • Attention-getter:  Story from my youth.  
  • It was three years ago.  Just after my freshmen year here at Judson.  It was summer, and it was my brother’s wedding day.  All morning I felt nauseous, a pit in my stomach.  I figured I was just nervous.  The day carried on, and pressure on my chest only got worse.  Before I knew it, I was laying on the floor of the bathroom screaming for my mom in a cold sweat, genuinely believing that I was going to have a heart attack on my brother’s wedding day. The scariest thing about panic attacks is the physical feelings that comes from your mentality.  So what happened next?  I forced myself to get up, go outside, walk, and breathe, and the paralyzing feeling left me.  I remember thinking, What is wrong with my mind?  Does it really have that much power over how I physically feel?  That’s when I decided I needed to study and work on my own personal mental health.  
  • Central Idea:  Art allows us to live out our truest selves.  Therapy, especially with art often seems reserved for those who have experienced trauma and loss.  But everyone is capable and often in need of an outlet to be expressive.  Artistic expression provides a healthy way, and sometimes the only way of revealing unknown and often suppressed emotions in an individual.  Artistic expression is healthy and needs to be accessible to all.  
  • Establish credibility and relate topic to audience:  Studies show, Despite its high level of treatability through therapy and/or medication, 2/3 of adults with anxiety do not receive treatment. Surpassing even depression, anxiety is the most common form of mental illness in the United States. It’s estimated that approximately 10 percent of teenagers and 40 percent of adults suffer from an anxiety disorder of some kind.
  • This applies to you, this applies to your loved ones. This applies to everyone. If you’re not an anxious person, you still have feelings and emotions.  You have good days and bad days. You have personalized ways of dealing with stress, anger, sadness, whether they be healthy or unhealthy outlets.  
  • ?Preview the main points:  Negative emotions are so often suppressed, and expressive ways of coping are usually reserved for the “damaged,” but I propose a toolkit for adults to be able to use artistic expression as an everyday means of promoting positive mental health.”
  • Transition: Let’s start by exploring human’s natural tendencies to suppress or express emotions.  ? ? ?
  • BODY
  • Negative emotions are often suppressed.
        1. In our youth, creativity was encouraged and available to us.
          1. Coloring outside the lines was a way of exploring and learning about the world around you.  As kids we were free.  We were expressive, and encouraged to do so.
          2. Growing up, we started being told to color in the lines, and study about things that “really matter in life.”  So we hit the books.  (NOT saying this is wrong, but where’s the creativity in this still crucial part of our lives?)
        2. (Suppression of feelings) Why do we suppress how we feel?  We are either uncomfortable or we suppress them without knowing.  Or we put things on the backburner because in the moment we feel ok about them. Why is this?
          1. Humans are complex.
          2. We don’t always handle the negative in healthy ways.
  • Art therapy is reserved for those with extreme situations.. Those who go through trauma, loss, injury.  
        1. Supporting point
          1. Art therapy’s purpose… allows the affected explore their feelings, reconcile emotional conflicts, foster self-awareness, manage behavior and addictions, develop social skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety, and increase self-esteem.
  • Why is art therapy for everyone?  Creating art provides a distraction, giving your brain a break from your usual thoughts.
        1. Even art itself seems reserved for the skilled.
          1. An art therapist said, “Many are afraid that since they aren’t very good at something, there is no point and they won’t get any benefit from doing it.  Another myth is that you have to work with an art therapist to get any therapeutic benefit from doing art. [insert transition]
      1. I propose the development of a toolkit for adults to be able to use artistic expression as an everyday means of promoting positive mental health.
  • Whatever the reason, an inner compulsion exists and I continue to honor this internal imperative. If I didn’t, I would feel really horrible. I would be a broken man. So whether attempting to make art is noble or selfish, the fact remains that I will do it nevertheless. Anything past this statement is speculation. I would be afraid that by proclaiming why I make art would be generating my own propaganda” http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/why_we_make_art.
  • We are all born with an innate desire to express ourselves and art encompasses a wider range of activities than you may have ever imagined.
  • Sub-supporting point
  • Art encourages creative thinking and lets you come up with your own unique solutions.  Out-of-the-box thinking also stimulates your brain to grow new neurons.
    1. CONCLUSION
  • Summary of the main points
  • Restatement of the central idea
  • Closing lines that relate back to the introduction
  • “Art washes from the soul the dust of everyday life.” ~ Pablo Picasso

 

 

  • Introduction
    • Attention-getter:  Story from my youth.
    • It was three years ago.  Just after my freshmen year here at Judson.  It was summer, and it was my brother’s wedding day.  All morning I felt nauseous, a pit in my stomach.  I figured I was just nervous.  The day carried on, and pressure on my chest only got worse.  Before I knew it, I was laying on the floor of the bathroom screaming for my mom in a cold sweat, genuinely believing that I was going to have a heart attack on my brother’s wedding day. The scariest thing about panic attacks is the physical feelings that comes from your mentality.  So what happened next?  I forced myself to get up, go outside, walk, and breathe, and the paralyzing feeling left me.  I remember thinking, What is wrong with my mind?  Does it really have that much power over how I physically feel?  That’s when I decided I needed to study and work on my own personal mental health.
    • Central Idea:  Art allows us to live out our truest selves.  Therapy, especially with art often seems reserved for those who have experienced trauma and loss.  But everyone is capable and often in need of an outlet to be expressive.  Artistic expression provides a healthy way, and sometimes the only way of revealing unknown and often suppressed emotions in an individual.  Artistic expression is healthy and needs to be accessible to all.
    • Negative emotions are often suppressed, and expressive ways of coping, such as traditional Art Therapy, are usually reserved for extreme cases. However, mental health practices apply to everyone—they apply to me, to you, and to your loved ones.  If you’re not an anxious person, you still have feelings and emotions. We all have good days and bad days. And each of us have personalized ways of dealing with stress, anger, sadness, whether they be healthy or unhealthy outlets.
    • And we all could benefit from the cathartic effects of artistic expression.
    • but I propose a toolkit for adults to be able to use artistic expression as an everyday means of promoting positive mental health.”
  • Body
  • Point 1—Rising Action (this) Anxiety and negative emotions are so often suppressed.  From youth to adulthood, we are taught to suppress expression.
    • Studies show, Despite its high level of treatability through therapy and/or medication, 2/3 of adults with anxiety do not receive treatment. Surpassing even depression, anxiety is the most common form of mental illness in the United States. It’s estimated that approximately 10 percent of teenagers and 40 percent of adults suffer from an anxiety disorder of some kind.
    • Teenagers with anxiety receive treatment even less frequently – only 1 in 5 teen sufferers do. https://www.dosomething.org/us/facts/11-facts-about-anxiety
    • In our youth, creativity was encouraged and available to us.
      1. Coloring outside the lines was a way of exploring and learning about the world around you.  As kids we were free.  We were expressive, and encouraged to do so.
      2. Growing up, we started being told to color in the lines, and study about things that “really matter in life.”  So we hit the books.  (NOT saying this is wrong, but where’s the creativity in this still crucial part of our lives?
      3. (Suppression of feelings) Why do we suppress how we feel?  We are either uncomfortable or we suppress them without knowing.  Or we put things on the backburner because in the moment we feel ok about them. Why is this?
        1. Humans are complex.
        2. We don’t always handle the negative in healthy ways.
  • Point 2—Climax (means that) It is not accessible for most people.
    1. Art therapy is reserved for those with extreme situations.. Those who go through trauma, loss, injury.  
      1. Art therapy’s purpose… allows the affected explore their feelings, reconcile emotional conflicts, foster self-awareness, manage behavior and addictions, develop social skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety, and increase self-esteem. Doesn’t really support point. Do you have statistic on who receives art therapy or how it is prescribed by a doctor?
    2. Even art itself seems reserved for the skilled.
      1. An art therapist said, “Many are afraid that since they aren’t very good at something, there is no point and they won’t get any benefit from doing it.  Another myth is that you have to work with an art therapist to get any therapeutic benefit from doing art. [insert transition] 
  • Point 3—Denouncement (so then, I propose this) Creative expression is beneficial to individuals mental health and needs to be accessible to all.
    1. “Whatever the reason, an inner compulsion exists and I continue to honor this internal imperative. If I didn’t, I would feel really horrible. I would be a broken man. So whether attempting to make art is noble or selfish, the fact remains that I will do it nevertheless. Anything past this statement is speculation. I would be afraid that by proclaiming why I make art would be generating my own propaganda”http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/why_we_make_art.
    2. We are all born with an innate desire to express ourselves and art encompasses a wider range of activities than you may have ever imagined.
    3. Creating art is a very effective way to stimulate the brain and anyone can do it. http://bebrainfit.com/the-health-benefits-of-art-are-for-everyone/
    4. Art encourages creative thinking and lets you come up with your own unique solutions.  Out-of-the-box thinking also stimulates your brain to grow new neurons.
  • Conclusion—I propose the development of a toolkit for adults to be able to use artistic expression as an everyday means of promoting positive mental health.
    • I want to gather resources for adults to practice creative expression, regardless of their artistic abilities.
    • The toolkit will serve as an entry-point into developing positive mental health practices and habits.
    • When we make maintaining our mental health a priority, we can see improvements in our every day lives, and can better identify when we may be in an unhealthy place, or experiencing something that may trigger an anxiety attack like mine, and possibly prevent them.
    • “Art washes from the soul the dust of everyday life.” ~ Pablo Picasso
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